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Investigating the growth of lymphomas

Dr Jörg Heierhorst is investigating how lymphomas begin. B cells are a type of white blood cell that forms part of your immune system. Uncontrolled growth of B cells causes one of the most common forms of cancer in humans, B cell lymphoma.

Dr Heierhorst explains “We found that when we remove a gene called ASCIZ from lymphoma-prone mice the onset of cancer is dramatically reduced. Now we want to test if we can similarly extend the survival of these mice by removing the ASCIZ gene after the cancer has formed.”

He continued “We know that ASCIZ functions by regulating another gene called DYNLL1. So we will also test if loss of DYNLL1 protects mice from developing B cell lymphoma, or if they live longer when DYNLL1 is inactivated after a lymphoma is already established. If successful, this would indicate that ASCIZ could be a promising target for the development of new drugs to treat B cell cancers in the future.”

Dr. Heierhorst added: "We are very honored and grateful for being awarded this Worldwide Cancer Research grant. This funding will enable us to speed up our efforts to find ways to target ASCIZ and DYNLL1 for future clinical uses."

New year, new research

We support research into all cancer types and this latest grant round was no exception. The projects contain a good mix of cancer types from mouth and lip to breast, lung, pancreatic, lymphoma and liver cancer to name but a few. And of course a large amount is being spent on understanding the very fundamental principles behind how our cells behave and what goes wrong in cancer. Keeping with our ethos of supporting the best research around the globe, the projects are taking place all over the world including England, Portugal, Greece, Spain, Australia, The Netherlands, France, Germany, USA and Canada.

Opening up about mouth cancer

Some of the projects that most excite us are Dr Guy Lyons from the University of Sydney, Australia. He is identifying genetic changes that occur when mouth cancer starts so that it can be diagnosed early, when treatment is more likely to be successful. You can read more about mouth cancer in our recent blog. Dr Lyons told us “The support of organisations such as Worldwide Cancer Research for research into the fundamental biology of cancer is essential for the discovery of new paradigms that enable new approaches in the clinic down the track.”

Developing new ‘super cameras’

Professor Carolyn Moores at Birkbeck University of London in England is developing state of the art electron microscopy to actually visualise where drugs bind (stick) to their target molecules inside the cancer cells. This is VERY cool.  She said “Revolutionary new imaging technology means that our pictures will provide unprecedented detail, from which we will calculate the three-dimensional shape of our samples. This technique could potentially revolutionise the way drug discovery is carried out and our findings could be used to design specific drugs that can be further developed to improve treatments for cancers in the future. It is an exciting time to be an electron microscopist and we are thrilled that Worldwide Cancer Research is supporting our research in this area.”

Studying ‘bubbles’ to beating childhood brain cancer

We are also funding Dr Kasper Rouschop at Maastricht University in The Netherlands (pictured above) who is studying how ‘bubbles’ released by glioblastoma tumours encourage blood vessels to grow into the tumour. Glioblastoma’s are a type of brain tumour that commonly effects.  He told us “We anticipate that the results of this research will enable us to evaluate whether targeting these particular bubbles could be a potential new way to reduce the growth of brain tumours.  Our approach is highly innovative and is based on our previous identification of “bubbles” that are specifically released by hypoxic tumour cells. Without the support of Worldwide Cancer Research, evaluation of this promising approach would not be possible.”

And last, but by no means marking the end of my list of fab new projects, is Dr Ruben van Boxtel at the Hubrecht Institute in the Netherlands. He is trying to figure out why cancer arises in some parts of the body more than others. Great question to try to answer!

Our next grant round is already underway and our Scientific Committee will meet in March to decide who gets funded.  But this relies on donations, no money means no research.  If you would like to join team Worldwide Cancer Research and make a donation today just text WORLDWIDE to 70004 to donate £10. Thank you.

Image kindly provided by Dr Kasper Rouchop.